Resistance training with slow speed of movement is better for hypertrophy and muscle strength gains than fast speed of movement.

  • Paulo Eduardo Assis Pereira 1Group of Studies and Research in Exercise 1-Physiology, Federal University of São Paulo, Santos, São Paulo, Brazil 2-Group of Studies in Sciences Physical Education, Praia Grande College, Praia Grande, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Yuri Lopes Motoyama 1Group of Studies and Research in Exercise Physiology, Federal University of São Paulo, Santos, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Gilmar Jesus Esteves 1Group of Studies and Research in Exercise 1-Physiology, Federal University of São Paulo, Santos, São Paulo, Brazil 2-Group of Studies in Sciences Physical Education, Praia Grande College, Praia Grande, São Paulo, Brazil
  • William Carlos Quinelato 1Group of Studies and Research in Exercise Physiology, Federal University of São Paulo, Santos, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Luciano Botter 1Group of Studies and Research in Exercise Physiology, Federal University of São Paulo, Santos, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Kelvin Hiroyuki Tanaka 1Group of Studies and Research in Exercise Physiology, Federal University of São Paulo, Santos, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Paulo Azevedo 1Group of Studies and Research in Exercise Physiology, Federal University of São Paulo, Santos, São Paulo, Brazil 3Department of Human Movement Science, Federal University of São Paulo, Santos, São Paulo, Brazil

Abstract

Repetition speed is an important variable during resistance training. However, the effects of different speeds on the muscular strength and hypertrophy in isotonic resistance training are not clear. The study compared fast speed with slow speed of isotonic resistance training on muscular strength and hypertrophy in well-trained adults. Twelve healthy adults were randomly assigned into two groups: fast speed (FS) and low speed (SS). Muscle hypertrophy was measured by an ultrasound examination of the cross-sectional area of the brachial biceps muscle. Muscular strength was verified by 1 RM test. To check the possible differences in strength and hypertrophy between pre and post training and between groups there were compared by two-way ANOVA for repeated measurements and the effect size (ES) was calculated. Improvement in the cross-sectional area (P=0.019) and muscular strength (P=0.021) in the SS group between pre and post training was verified. The SS group had bigger effect sizes than FS group for hypertrophy and strength from pre to post training.  SS training was more effective to improve hypertrophy and muscle strength in well-trained adults.
KEY WORDS: strength training, isotonic contraction, muscle strength

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References

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Published
2016-06-16
How to Cite
1.
Eduardo Assis Pereira P, Lopes Motoyama Y, Jesus Esteves G, Carlos Quinelato W, Botter L, Hiroyuki Tanaka K, Azevedo P. Resistance training with slow speed of movement is better for hypertrophy and muscle strength gains than fast speed of movement. IJAEP [Internet]. 16Jun.2016 [cited 22Aug.2018];5(2):37-3. Available from: http://www.ijaep.com/index.php/IJAE/article/view/51
Section
Applied Exercise Physiology